Topic Summary

(forthcoming)

Related Content

Relevant External Resources

BibBase https://api.zotero.org/users/6447874/collections/FXYINJWN/items?key=IrpOOS7Vv0HVOJDqiiayrC2F&format=bibtex&limit=100
generated by
This is just a preview! If you would like to use this list on your web page or create a new webpage based on this, create a free account and upload the file there. Then you will be able to modify it going forward.

To the site owner:

Action required! Mendeley is changing its API. In order to keep using Mendeley with BibBase past April 14th, you need to:

  1. renew the authorization for BibBase on Mendeley, and
  2. update the BibBase URL in your page the same way you did when you initially set up this page.

Fix it now

  2021 (1)
Antifragility. March 2021. Publication Title: Wikipedia
Paper   link   bibtex   abstract  
@book{noauthor_antifragility_2021,
	title = {Antifragility},
	copyright = {Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License},
	url = {https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Antifragility&oldid=1013667270},
	abstract = {Antifragility is a property of systems in which they increase in capability to thrive as a result of stressors, shocks, volatility, noise, mistakes, faults, attacks, or failures. The concept was developed by Nassim Nicholas Taleb in his book, Antifragile, and in technical papers. As Taleb explains in his book, antifragility is fundamentally different from the concepts of resiliency (i.e. the ability to recover from failure) and robustness (that is, the ability to resist failure). The concept has been applied in risk analysis, physics, molecular biology, transportation planning, engineering, Aerospace (NASA), and computer science.Taleb defines it as follows in a letter to Nature responding to an earlier review of his book in that journal: Simply, antifragility is defined as a convex response to a stressor or source of harm (for some range of variation), leading to a positive sensitivity to increase in volatility (or variability, stress, dispersion of outcomes, or uncertainty, what is grouped under the designation "disorder cluster"). Likewise fragility is defined as a concave sensitivity to stressors, leading to a negative sensitivity to increase in volatility. The relation between fragility, convexity, and sensitivity to disorder is mathematical, obtained by theorem, not derived from empirical data mining or some historical narrative. It is a priori.},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2021-04-09},
	month = mar,
	year = {2021},
	note = {Publication Title: Wikipedia},
}

Antifragility is a property of systems in which they increase in capability to thrive as a result of stressors, shocks, volatility, noise, mistakes, faults, attacks, or failures. The concept was developed by Nassim Nicholas Taleb in his book, Antifragile, and in technical papers. As Taleb explains in his book, antifragility is fundamentally different from the concepts of resiliency (i.e. the ability to recover from failure) and robustness (that is, the ability to resist failure). The concept has been applied in risk analysis, physics, molecular biology, transportation planning, engineering, Aerospace (NASA), and computer science.Taleb defines it as follows in a letter to Nature responding to an earlier review of his book in that journal: Simply, antifragility is defined as a convex response to a stressor or source of harm (for some range of variation), leading to a positive sensitivity to increase in volatility (or variability, stress, dispersion of outcomes, or uncertainty, what is grouped under the designation "disorder cluster"). Likewise fragility is defined as a concave sensitivity to stressors, leading to a negative sensitivity to increase in volatility. The relation between fragility, convexity, and sensitivity to disorder is mathematical, obtained by theorem, not derived from empirical data mining or some historical narrative. It is a priori.
  2020 (7)
Phenomenal Consciousness and Emergence: Eliminating the Explanatory Gap. Feinberg, T. E.; and Mallatt, J. Frontiers in Psychology, 11. 2020. Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{feinberg_phenomenal_2020,
	title = {Phenomenal {Consciousness} and {Emergence}: {Eliminating} the {Explanatory} {Gap}},
	volume = {11},
	shorttitle = {Phenomenal {Consciousness} and {Emergence}},
	url = {https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7304239/},
	doi = {10.3389/fpsyg.2020.01041},
	abstract = {The role of emergence in the creation of consciousness has been debated for over a century, but it remains unresolved. In particular there is controversy over the claim that a “strong” or radical form of emergence is required to explain ...},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2021-08-10},
	journal = {Frontiers in Psychology},
	author = {Feinberg, Todd E. and Mallatt, Jon},
	year = {2020},
	pmid = {32595555},
	note = {Publisher: Frontiers Media SA},
}

The role of emergence in the creation of consciousness has been debated for over a century, but it remains unresolved. In particular there is controversy over the claim that a “strong” or radical form of emergence is required to explain ...
Quantitative Systems Pharmacology for Neuroscience Drug Discovery and Development: Current Status, Opportunities, and Challenges. Geerts, H.; Wikswo, J.; Graaf, P. H. v. d.; Bai, J. P. F.; Gaiteri, C.; Bennett, D.; Swalley, S. E.; Schuck, E.; Kaddurah‐Daouk, R.; Tsaioun, K.; and Pelleymounter, M. CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology, 9(1): 5–20. 2020. ZSCC: NoCitationData[s0] _eprint: https://ascpt.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/psp4.12478
Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{geerts_quantitative_2020,
	title = {Quantitative {Systems} {Pharmacology} for {Neuroscience} {Drug} {Discovery} and {Development}: {Current} {Status}, {Opportunities}, and {Challenges}},
	volume = {9},
	copyright = {© 2019 The Authors. CPT: Pharmacometrics \& Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics},
	issn = {2163-8306},
	shorttitle = {Quantitative {Systems} {Pharmacology} for {Neuroscience} {Drug} {Discovery} and {Development}},
	url = {https://ascpt.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/psp4.12478},
	doi = {https://doi.org/10.1002/psp4.12478},
	abstract = {The substantial progress made in the basic sciences of the brain has yet to be adequately translated to successful clinical therapeutics to treat central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Possible explanations include the lack of quantitative and validated biomarkers, the subjective nature of many clinical endpoints, and complex pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships, but also the possibility that highly selective drugs in the CNS do not reflect the complex interactions of different brain circuits. Although computational systems pharmacology modeling designed to capture essential components of complex biological systems has been increasingly accepted in pharmaceutical research and development for oncology, inflammation, and metabolic disorders, the uptake in the CNS field has been very modest. In this article, a cross-disciplinary group with representatives from academia, pharma, regulatory, and funding agencies make the case that the identification and exploitation of CNS therapeutic targets for drug discovery and development can benefit greatly from a system and network approach that can span the gap between molecular pathways and the neuronal circuits that ultimately regulate brain activity and behavior. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), in collaboration with the National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), and National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), convened a workshop to explore and evaluate the potential of a quantitative systems pharmacology (QSP) approach to CNS drug discovery and development. The objective of the workshop was to identify the challenges and opportunities of QSP as an approach to accelerate drug discovery and development in the field of CNS disorders. In particular, the workshop examined the potential for computational neuroscience to perform QSP-based interrogation of the mechanism of action for CNS diseases, along with a more accurate and comprehensive method for evaluating drug effects and optimizing the design of clinical trials. Following up on an earlier white paper on the use of QSP in general disease mechanism of action and drug discovery, this report focuses on new applications, opportunities, and the accompanying limitations of QSP as an approach to drug development in the CNS therapeutic area based on the discussions in the workshop with various stakeholders.},
	language = {en},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2021-04-22},
	journal = {CPT: Pharmacometrics \& Systems Pharmacology},
	author = {Geerts, Hugo and Wikswo, John and Graaf, Piet H. van der and Bai, Jane P. F. and Gaiteri, Chris and Bennett, David and Swalley, Susanne E. and Schuck, Edgar and Kaddurah‐Daouk, Rima and Tsaioun, Katya and Pelleymounter, Mary},
	year = {2020},
	note = {ZSCC: NoCitationData[s0] 
\_eprint: https://ascpt.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/psp4.12478},
	pages = {5--20},
}

The substantial progress made in the basic sciences of the brain has yet to be adequately translated to successful clinical therapeutics to treat central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Possible explanations include the lack of quantitative and validated biomarkers, the subjective nature of many clinical endpoints, and complex pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships, but also the possibility that highly selective drugs in the CNS do not reflect the complex interactions of different brain circuits. Although computational systems pharmacology modeling designed to capture essential components of complex biological systems has been increasingly accepted in pharmaceutical research and development for oncology, inflammation, and metabolic disorders, the uptake in the CNS field has been very modest. In this article, a cross-disciplinary group with representatives from academia, pharma, regulatory, and funding agencies make the case that the identification and exploitation of CNS therapeutic targets for drug discovery and development can benefit greatly from a system and network approach that can span the gap between molecular pathways and the neuronal circuits that ultimately regulate brain activity and behavior. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), in collaboration with the National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), and National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), convened a workshop to explore and evaluate the potential of a quantitative systems pharmacology (QSP) approach to CNS drug discovery and development. The objective of the workshop was to identify the challenges and opportunities of QSP as an approach to accelerate drug discovery and development in the field of CNS disorders. In particular, the workshop examined the potential for computational neuroscience to perform QSP-based interrogation of the mechanism of action for CNS diseases, along with a more accurate and comprehensive method for evaluating drug effects and optimizing the design of clinical trials. Following up on an earlier white paper on the use of QSP in general disease mechanism of action and drug discovery, this report focuses on new applications, opportunities, and the accompanying limitations of QSP as an approach to drug development in the CNS therapeutic area based on the discussions in the workshop with various stakeholders.
Sensorimotor Integration Can Enhance Auditory Perception. Myers, J. C.; Mock, J. R.; and Golob, E. J. Scientific Reports, 10(1): 1496. January 2020. ZSCC: 0000000 Number: 1 Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{myers_sensorimotor_2020,
	title = {Sensorimotor {Integration} {Can} {Enhance} {Auditory} {Perception}},
	volume = {10},
	copyright = {2020 The Author(s)},
	issn = {2045-2322},
	url = {https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-58447-z},
	doi = {10.1038/s41598-020-58447-z},
	abstract = {Whenever we move, speak, or play musical instruments, our actions generate auditory sensory input. The sensory consequences of our actions are thought to be predicted via sensorimotor integration, which involves anatomical and functional links between auditory and motor brain regions. The physiological connections are relatively well established, but less is known about how sensorimotor integration affects auditory perception. The sensory attenuation hypothesis suggests that the perceived loudness of self-generated sounds is attenuated to help distinguish self-generated sounds from ambient sounds. Sensory attenuation would work for louder ambient sounds, but could lead to less accurate perception if the ambient sounds were quieter. We hypothesize that a key function of sensorimotor integration is the facilitated processing of self-generated sounds, leading to more accurate perception under most conditions. The sensory attenuation hypothesis predicts better performance for higher but not lower intensity comparisons, whereas sensory facilitation predicts improved perception regardless of comparison sound intensity. A series of experiments tested these hypotheses, with results supporting the enhancement hypothesis. Overall, people were more accurate at comparing the loudness of two sounds when making one of the sounds themselves. We propose that the brain selectively modulates the perception of self-generated sounds to enhance representations of action consequences.},
	language = {en},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2020-10-06},
	journal = {Scientific Reports},
	author = {Myers, John C. and Mock, Jeffrey R. and Golob, Edward J.},
	month = jan,
	year = {2020},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000000 
Number: 1
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group},
	pages = {1496},
}

Whenever we move, speak, or play musical instruments, our actions generate auditory sensory input. The sensory consequences of our actions are thought to be predicted via sensorimotor integration, which involves anatomical and functional links between auditory and motor brain regions. The physiological connections are relatively well established, but less is known about how sensorimotor integration affects auditory perception. The sensory attenuation hypothesis suggests that the perceived loudness of self-generated sounds is attenuated to help distinguish self-generated sounds from ambient sounds. Sensory attenuation would work for louder ambient sounds, but could lead to less accurate perception if the ambient sounds were quieter. We hypothesize that a key function of sensorimotor integration is the facilitated processing of self-generated sounds, leading to more accurate perception under most conditions. The sensory attenuation hypothesis predicts better performance for higher but not lower intensity comparisons, whereas sensory facilitation predicts improved perception regardless of comparison sound intensity. A series of experiments tested these hypotheses, with results supporting the enhancement hypothesis. Overall, people were more accurate at comparing the loudness of two sounds when making one of the sounds themselves. We propose that the brain selectively modulates the perception of self-generated sounds to enhance representations of action consequences.
Free Energy and the Self: An Ecological–Enactive Interpretation. Kiverstein, J. Topoi, 39(3): 559–574. July 2020. ZSCC: 0000014
Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{kiverstein_free_2020,
	title = {Free {Energy} and the {Self}: {An} {Ecological}–{Enactive} {Interpretation}},
	volume = {39},
	issn = {1572-8749},
	shorttitle = {Free {Energy} and the {Self}},
	url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s11245-018-9561-5},
	doi = {10.1007/s11245-018-9561-5},
	abstract = {According to the free energy principle all living systems aim to minimise free energy in their sensory exchanges with the environment. Processes of free energy minimisation are thus ubiquitous in the biological world. Indeed it has been argued that even plants engage in free energy minimisation. Not all living things however feel alive. How then did the feeling of being alive get started? In line with the arguments of the phenomenologists, I will claim that every feeling must be felt by someone. It must have mineness built into it if it is to feel a particular way. The question I take up in this paper asks how mineness might have arisen out of processes of free energy minimisation, given that many systems that keep themselves alive lack mineness. The hypothesis I develop in this paper is that the life of an organism can be seen as an inferential process. Every living system embodies a probability distribution conditioned on a model of the sensory, physiological, and morphological states that are highly probably given the life it leads and the niche it inhabits. I argue for an ecological and enactive interpretation of free energy. I show how once the life of an organism reaches a certain level of complexity mineness emerges as an intrinsic part of the process of life itself.},
	language = {en},
	number = {3},
	urldate = {2020-10-06},
	journal = {Topoi},
	author = {Kiverstein, Julian},
	month = jul,
	year = {2020},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000014},
	pages = {559--574},
}

According to the free energy principle all living systems aim to minimise free energy in their sensory exchanges with the environment. Processes of free energy minimisation are thus ubiquitous in the biological world. Indeed it has been argued that even plants engage in free energy minimisation. Not all living things however feel alive. How then did the feeling of being alive get started? In line with the arguments of the phenomenologists, I will claim that every feeling must be felt by someone. It must have mineness built into it if it is to feel a particular way. The question I take up in this paper asks how mineness might have arisen out of processes of free energy minimisation, given that many systems that keep themselves alive lack mineness. The hypothesis I develop in this paper is that the life of an organism can be seen as an inferential process. Every living system embodies a probability distribution conditioned on a model of the sensory, physiological, and morphological states that are highly probably given the life it leads and the niche it inhabits. I argue for an ecological and enactive interpretation of free energy. I show how once the life of an organism reaches a certain level of complexity mineness emerges as an intrinsic part of the process of life itself.
Enactive becoming. Di Paolo, E. A. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences. January 2020.
Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{di_paolo_enactive_2020,
	title = {Enactive becoming},
	issn = {1572-8676},
	url = {https://doi.org/10.1007/s11097-019-09654-1},
	doi = {10.1007/s11097-019-09654-1},
	abstract = {The enactive approach provides a perspective on human bodies in their organic, sensorimotor, social, and linguistic dimensions, but many fundamental issues still remain unaddressed. A crucial desideratum for a theory of human bodies is that it be able to account for concrete human becoming. In this article I show that enactive theory possesses resources to achieve this goal. Being an existential structure, human becoming is best approached by a series of progressive formal indications. I discuss three standpoints on human becoming as open, indeterminate, and therefore historical using the voices of Pico della Mirandola, Gordon W. Allport, and Paulo Freire. Drawing on Gilbert Simondon’s philosophy of individuation we move from an existential to an ontological register in looking at modes of embodied becoming. His scheme of interpretation of the relation between modes of individuation allows us to understand human becoming in terms of a tendency to neotenization. I compare this ontology with an enactive theoretical account of the dimensions of embodiment, finding several compatibilities and complementarities. Various forms of bodily unfinishedness in enaction fit the Simondonian ontology and the existential analysis, where transindividuality corresponds to participatory sense-making and Freire’s joint becoming of individuals and communities correlates with the open tensions in linguistic bodies between incorporation and incarnation of linguistic acts. I test some of this ideas by considering the plausibility of artificial bodies and personal becoming from an enactive perspective, using the case of replicants in the film Blade Runner. The conclusion is that any kind of personhood, replicants included, requires living through an actual history of concrete becoming.},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2020-08-24},
	journal = {Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences},
	author = {Di Paolo, Ezequiel A.},
	month = jan,
	year = {2020},
	keywords = {Communities, Enaction, Gilbert Simondon, Human becoming, Individuality, Replicants},
}

The enactive approach provides a perspective on human bodies in their organic, sensorimotor, social, and linguistic dimensions, but many fundamental issues still remain unaddressed. A crucial desideratum for a theory of human bodies is that it be able to account for concrete human becoming. In this article I show that enactive theory possesses resources to achieve this goal. Being an existential structure, human becoming is best approached by a series of progressive formal indications. I discuss three standpoints on human becoming as open, indeterminate, and therefore historical using the voices of Pico della Mirandola, Gordon W. Allport, and Paulo Freire. Drawing on Gilbert Simondon’s philosophy of individuation we move from an existential to an ontological register in looking at modes of embodied becoming. His scheme of interpretation of the relation between modes of individuation allows us to understand human becoming in terms of a tendency to neotenization. I compare this ontology with an enactive theoretical account of the dimensions of embodiment, finding several compatibilities and complementarities. Various forms of bodily unfinishedness in enaction fit the Simondonian ontology and the existential analysis, where transindividuality corresponds to participatory sense-making and Freire’s joint becoming of individuals and communities correlates with the open tensions in linguistic bodies between incorporation and incarnation of linguistic acts. I test some of this ideas by considering the plausibility of artificial bodies and personal becoming from an enactive perspective, using the case of replicants in the film Blade Runner. The conclusion is that any kind of personhood, replicants included, requires living through an actual history of concrete becoming.
Causal inference in degenerate systems: An impossibility result. Wang, Y.; and Wang, L. In International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics, pages 3383–3392, June 2020. PMLR ZSCC: 0000000 ISSN: 2640-3498
Paper   link   bibtex   abstract  
@inproceedings{wang_causal_2020,
	title = {Causal inference in degenerate systems: {An} impossibility result},
	shorttitle = {Causal inference in degenerate systems},
	url = {http://proceedings.mlr.press/v108/wang20i.html},
	abstract = {Causal relationships among variables are commonly represented via directed acyclic graphs. There are many methods in the literature to quantify the strength of arrows in a causal acyclic graph. The...},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2020-08-20},
	booktitle = {International {Conference} on {Artificial} {Intelligence} and {Statistics}},
	publisher = {PMLR},
	author = {Wang, Yue and Wang, Linbo},
	month = jun,
	year = {2020},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000000 
ISSN: 2640-3498},
	pages = {3383--3392},
}

Causal relationships among variables are commonly represented via directed acyclic graphs. There are many methods in the literature to quantify the strength of arrows in a causal acyclic graph. The...
Identifying Polyhedra Enabling Memorable Strategic Mapping. Judge, A. . June 2020. ZSCC: NoCitationData[s0]
Paper   link   bibtex  
@article{judge_identifying_2020,
	title = {Identifying {Polyhedra} {Enabling} {Memorable} {Strategic} {Mapping}},
	url = {https://www.laetusinpraesens.org/docs10s/polypoly.php},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2020-06-24},
	author = {Judge, Anthony},
	month = jun,
	year = {2020},
	note = {ZSCC: NoCitationData[s0]},
}

  2019 (3)
Why Open-Endedness Matters. Stanley, K. O. Artificial Life, 25(3): 232–235. 2019. ZSCC: 0000011
doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{stanley_why_2019,
	title = {Why {Open}-{Endedness} {Matters}},
	volume = {25},
	issn = {1530-9185},
	doi = {10.1162/artl_a_00294},
	abstract = {Rather than acting as a review or analysis of the field, this essay focuses squarely on the motivations for investigating open-endedness and the opportunities it opens up. It begins by contemplating the awesome accomplishments of evolution in nature and the profound implications if such a process could be ignited on a computer. Some of the milestones in our understanding so far are then discussed, finally closing by highlighting the grand challenge of formalizing open-endedness as a computational process that can be encoded as an algorithm. The main contribution is to articulate why open-endedness deserves a place alongside artificial intelligence as one of the great computational challenges, and opportunities, of our time.},
	language = {eng},
	number = {3},
	journal = {Artificial Life},
	author = {Stanley, Kenneth O.},
	year = {2019},
	pmid = {31397603},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000011 },
	keywords = {Algorithms, Artificial Intelligence, Biological Evolution, Computational Biology, Models, Theoretical, Open-endedness, artificial intelligence, machine learning, novelty search, open-ended algorithms, open-ended evolution, quality diversity},
	pages = {232--235},
}

Rather than acting as a review or analysis of the field, this essay focuses squarely on the motivations for investigating open-endedness and the opportunities it opens up. It begins by contemplating the awesome accomplishments of evolution in nature and the profound implications if such a process could be ignited on a computer. Some of the milestones in our understanding so far are then discussed, finally closing by highlighting the grand challenge of formalizing open-endedness as a computational process that can be encoded as an algorithm. The main contribution is to articulate why open-endedness deserves a place alongside artificial intelligence as one of the great computational challenges, and opportunities, of our time.
Be the change you seek in science. Milham, M. P.; and Klein, A. BMC Biology, 17. 2019. Publisher: BioMed Central
Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{milham_be_2019,
	title = {Be the change you seek in science},
	volume = {17},
	url = {https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6436210/},
	doi = {10.1186/s12915-019-0647-3},
	abstract = {Few would argue that science is better done in silos, with no transparency or sharing of methods and resources. Yet scientists and scientific stakeholders (e.g., academic institutions, funding agencies, journals) alike continue to find themselves at a ...},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2021-04-22},
	journal = {BMC Biology},
	author = {Milham, Michael P. and Klein, Arno},
	year = {2019},
	pmid = {30914050},
	note = {Publisher: BioMed Central},
}

Few would argue that science is better done in silos, with no transparency or sharing of methods and resources. Yet scientists and scientific stakeholders (e.g., academic institutions, funding agencies, journals) alike continue to find themselves at a ...
Contributions of sociometabolic research to sustainability science. Haberl, H.; Wiedenhofer, D.; Pauliuk, S.; Krausmann, F.; Müller, D. B.; and Fischer-Kowalski, M. Nature Sustainability, 2(3): 173–184. March 2019. ZSCC: 0000048
Paper   doi   link   bibtex  
@article{haberl_contributions_2019,
	title = {Contributions of sociometabolic research to sustainability science},
	volume = {2},
	issn = {2398-9629},
	url = {http://www.nature.com/articles/s41893-019-0225-2},
	doi = {10.1038/s41893-019-0225-2},
	language = {en},
	number = {3},
	urldate = {2020-10-06},
	journal = {Nature Sustainability},
	author = {Haberl, Helmut and Wiedenhofer, Dominik and Pauliuk, Stefan and Krausmann, Fridolin and Müller, Daniel B. and Fischer-Kowalski, Marina},
	month = mar,
	year = {2019},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000048},
	pages = {173--184},
}

  2018 (1)
The Markov blankets of life: autonomy, active inference and the free energy principle. Kirchhoff, M.; Parr, T.; Palacios, E.; Friston, K.; and Kiverstein, J. Journal of The Royal Society Interface, 15(138): 20170792. January 2018. ZSCC: 0000103
Paper   doi   link   bibtex  
@article{kirchhoff_markov_2018,
	title = {The {Markov} blankets of life: autonomy, active inference and the free energy principle},
	volume = {15},
	issn = {1742-5689, 1742-5662},
	shorttitle = {The {Markov} blankets of life},
	url = {https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsif.2017.0792},
	doi = {10.1098/rsif.2017.0792},
	language = {en},
	number = {138},
	urldate = {2020-06-18},
	journal = {Journal of The Royal Society Interface},
	author = {Kirchhoff, Michael and Parr, Thomas and Palacios, Ensor and Friston, Karl and Kiverstein, Julian},
	month = jan,
	year = {2018},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000103},
	pages = {20170792},
}

  2017 (2)
Active Inference, Curiosity and Insight. Friston, K. J.; Lin, M.; Frith, C. D.; Pezzulo, G.; Hobson, J. A.; and Ondobaka, S. Neural Computation, 29(10): 2633–2683. October 2017. ZSCC: 0000226
Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{friston_active_2017,
	title = {Active {Inference}, {Curiosity} and {Insight}},
	volume = {29},
	issn = {0899-7667},
	url = {https://doi.org/10.1162/neco_a_00999},
	doi = {10.1162/neco_a_00999},
	abstract = {This article offers a formal account of curiosity and insight in terms of active (Bayesian) inference. It deals with the dual problem of inferring states of the world and learning its statistical structure. In contrast to current trends in machine learning (e.g., deep learning), we focus on how people attain insight and understanding using just a handful of observations, which are solicited through curious behavior. We use simulations of abstract rule learning and approximate Bayesian inference to show that minimizing (expected) variational free energy leads to active sampling of novel contingencies. This epistemic behavior closes explanatory gaps in generative models of the world, thereby reducing uncertainty and satisfying curiosity. We then move from epistemic learning to model selection or structure learning to show how abductive processes emerge when agents test plausible hypotheses about symmetries (i.e., invariances or rules) in their generative models. The ensuing Bayesian model reduction evinces mechanisms associated with sleep and has all the hallmarks of “aha” moments. This formulation moves toward a computational account of consciousness in the pre-Cartesian sense of sharable knowledge (i.e., con: “together”; scire: “to know”).},
	number = {10},
	urldate = {2021-06-05},
	journal = {Neural Computation},
	author = {Friston, Karl J. and Lin, Marco and Frith, Christopher D. and Pezzulo, Giovanni and Hobson, J. Allan and Ondobaka, Sasha},
	month = oct,
	year = {2017},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000226},
	pages = {2633--2683},
}

This article offers a formal account of curiosity and insight in terms of active (Bayesian) inference. It deals with the dual problem of inferring states of the world and learning its statistical structure. In contrast to current trends in machine learning (e.g., deep learning), we focus on how people attain insight and understanding using just a handful of observations, which are solicited through curious behavior. We use simulations of abstract rule learning and approximate Bayesian inference to show that minimizing (expected) variational free energy leads to active sampling of novel contingencies. This epistemic behavior closes explanatory gaps in generative models of the world, thereby reducing uncertainty and satisfying curiosity. We then move from epistemic learning to model selection or structure learning to show how abductive processes emerge when agents test plausible hypotheses about symmetries (i.e., invariances or rules) in their generative models. The ensuing Bayesian model reduction evinces mechanisms associated with sleep and has all the hallmarks of “aha” moments. This formulation moves toward a computational account of consciousness in the pre-Cartesian sense of sharable knowledge (i.e., con: “together”; scire: “to know”).
A network theory of mental disorders. Borsboom, D. World Psychiatry, 16(1): 5–13. 2017. ZSCC: 0000706 _eprint: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/wps.20375
Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{borsboom_network_2017,
	title = {A network theory of mental disorders},
	volume = {16},
	issn = {2051-5545},
	url = {https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/wps.20375},
	doi = {10.1002/wps.20375},
	abstract = {In recent years, the network approach to psychopathology has been advanced as an alternative way of conceptualizing mental disorders. In this approach, mental disorders arise from direct interactions between symptoms. Although the network approach has led to many novel methodologies and substantive applications, it has not yet been fully articulated as a scientific theory of mental disorders. The present paper aims to develop such a theory, by postulating a limited set of theoretical principles regarding the structure and dynamics of symptom networks. At the heart of the theory lies the notion that symptoms of psychopathology are causally connected through myriads of biological, psychological and societal mechanisms. If these causal relations are sufficiently strong, symptoms can generate a level of feedback that renders them self-sustaining. In this case, the network can get stuck in a disorder state. The network theory holds that this is a general feature of mental disorders, which can therefore be understood as alternative stable states of strongly connected symptom networks. This idea naturally leads to a comprehensive model of psychopathology, encompassing a common explanatory model for mental disorders, as well as novel definitions of associated concepts such as mental health, resilience, vulnerability and liability. In addition, the network theory has direct implications for how to understand diagnosis and treatment, and suggests a clear agenda for future research in psychiatry and associated disciplines.},
	language = {en},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2020-10-13},
	journal = {World Psychiatry},
	author = {Borsboom, Denny},
	year = {2017},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000706 
\_eprint: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/wps.20375},
	keywords = {Psychopathology, diagnosis, mental disorders, mental health, network approach, resilience, symptom networks, treatment, vulnerability},
	pages = {5--13},
}

In recent years, the network approach to psychopathology has been advanced as an alternative way of conceptualizing mental disorders. In this approach, mental disorders arise from direct interactions between symptoms. Although the network approach has led to many novel methodologies and substantive applications, it has not yet been fully articulated as a scientific theory of mental disorders. The present paper aims to develop such a theory, by postulating a limited set of theoretical principles regarding the structure and dynamics of symptom networks. At the heart of the theory lies the notion that symptoms of psychopathology are causally connected through myriads of biological, psychological and societal mechanisms. If these causal relations are sufficiently strong, symptoms can generate a level of feedback that renders them self-sustaining. In this case, the network can get stuck in a disorder state. The network theory holds that this is a general feature of mental disorders, which can therefore be understood as alternative stable states of strongly connected symptom networks. This idea naturally leads to a comprehensive model of psychopathology, encompassing a common explanatory model for mental disorders, as well as novel definitions of associated concepts such as mental health, resilience, vulnerability and liability. In addition, the network theory has direct implications for how to understand diagnosis and treatment, and suggests a clear agenda for future research in psychiatry and associated disciplines.
  2014 (3)
Cortical EEG oscillations and network connectivity as efficacy indices for assessing drugs with cognition enhancing potential. Ahnaou, A.; Huysmans, H.; Jacobs, T.; and Drinkenburg, W. H. I. M. Neuropharmacology, 86: 362–377. November 2014. ZSCC: 0000048
Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{ahnaou_cortical_2014,
	title = {Cortical {EEG} oscillations and network connectivity as efficacy indices for assessing drugs with cognition enhancing potential},
	volume = {86},
	issn = {0028-3908},
	url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0028390814002986},
	doi = {10.1016/j.neuropharm.2014.08.015},
	abstract = {Synchronization of electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations represents a core mechanism for cortical and subcortical networks, and disturbance in neural synchrony underlies cognitive processing deficits in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we investigated the effects of cognition enhancers (donepezil, rivastigmine, tacrine, galantamine and memantine), which are approved for symptomatic treatment of dementia, on EEG oscillations and network connectivity in conscious rats chronically instrumented with epidural electrodes in different cortical areas. Next, EEG network indices of cognitive impairments with the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine were modeled. Lastly, we examined the efficacy of cognition enhancers to normalize those aberrant oscillations. Cognition enhancers elicited systematic (“fingerprint”) enhancement of cortical slow theta (4.5–6 Hz) and gamma (30.5–50 Hz) oscillations correlated with lower activity levels. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed a compact cluster that corresponds to shared underlying mechanisms as compared to different drug classes. Functional network connectivity revealed consistent elevated coherent slow theta activity in parieto-occipital and between interhemispheric cortical areas. In rats instrumented with depth hippocampal CA1-CA3 electrodes, donepezil elicited similar oscillatory and coherent activities in cortico-hippocampal networks. When combined with scopolamine, the cognition enhancers attenuated the leftward shift in coherent slow delta activity. Such a consistent shift in EEG coherence into slow oscillations associated with altered slow theta and gamma oscillations may underlie cognitive deficits in scopolamine-treated animals, whereas enhanced coherent slow theta and gamma activity may be a relevant mechanism by which cognition enhancers exert their beneficial effect on plasticity and cognitive processes. The findings underscore that PCA and network connectivity are valuable tools to assess efficacy of novel therapeutic drugs with cognition enhancing potential.},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2020-10-06},
	journal = {Neuropharmacology},
	author = {Ahnaou, A. and Huysmans, H. and Jacobs, T. and Drinkenburg, W. H. I. M.},
	month = nov,
	year = {2014},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000048},
	keywords = {Animal model, Cognition enhancers, Coherent functional network, EEG oscillations, Neurodegenerative disorders, Translational biomarker},
	pages = {362--377},
}

Synchronization of electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations represents a core mechanism for cortical and subcortical networks, and disturbance in neural synchrony underlies cognitive processing deficits in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we investigated the effects of cognition enhancers (donepezil, rivastigmine, tacrine, galantamine and memantine), which are approved for symptomatic treatment of dementia, on EEG oscillations and network connectivity in conscious rats chronically instrumented with epidural electrodes in different cortical areas. Next, EEG network indices of cognitive impairments with the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine were modeled. Lastly, we examined the efficacy of cognition enhancers to normalize those aberrant oscillations. Cognition enhancers elicited systematic (“fingerprint”) enhancement of cortical slow theta (4.5–6 Hz) and gamma (30.5–50 Hz) oscillations correlated with lower activity levels. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed a compact cluster that corresponds to shared underlying mechanisms as compared to different drug classes. Functional network connectivity revealed consistent elevated coherent slow theta activity in parieto-occipital and between interhemispheric cortical areas. In rats instrumented with depth hippocampal CA1-CA3 electrodes, donepezil elicited similar oscillatory and coherent activities in cortico-hippocampal networks. When combined with scopolamine, the cognition enhancers attenuated the leftward shift in coherent slow delta activity. Such a consistent shift in EEG coherence into slow oscillations associated with altered slow theta and gamma oscillations may underlie cognitive deficits in scopolamine-treated animals, whereas enhanced coherent slow theta and gamma activity may be a relevant mechanism by which cognition enhancers exert their beneficial effect on plasticity and cognitive processes. The findings underscore that PCA and network connectivity are valuable tools to assess efficacy of novel therapeutic drugs with cognition enhancing potential.
Interdisciplinarity as cognitive integration: auditory verbal hallucinations as a case study. Bernini, M.; and Woods, A. WIREs Cognitive Science, 5(5): 603–612. 2014. ZSCC: 0000008 _eprint: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/wcs.1305
Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{bernini_interdisciplinarity_2014,
	title = {Interdisciplinarity as cognitive integration: auditory verbal hallucinations as a case study},
	volume = {5},
	issn = {1939-5086},
	shorttitle = {Interdisciplinarity as cognitive integration},
	url = {https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/wcs.1305},
	doi = {10.1002/wcs.1305},
	abstract = {In this article, we advocate a bottom-up direction for the methodological modeling of interdisciplinary research based on concrete interactions among individuals within interdisciplinary projects. Drawing on our experience in Hearing the Voice (a cross-disciplinary project on auditory verbal hallucinations running at Durham University), we focus on the dynamic if also problematic integration of cognitive science (neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and of mind), phenomenology, and humanistic disciplines (literature, narratology, history, and theology). We propose a new model for disciplinary integration which brings to the fore an under-investigated dynamic of interdisciplinary projects, namely their being processes of distributed cognition and cognitive integration. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:603–612. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1305 This article is categorized under: Philosophy {\textgreater} Knowledge and Belief},
	language = {en},
	number = {5},
	urldate = {2020-06-18},
	journal = {WIREs Cognitive Science},
	author = {Bernini, Marco and Woods, Angela},
	year = {2014},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000008 
\_eprint: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/wcs.1305},
	keywords = {***},
	pages = {603--612},
}

In this article, we advocate a bottom-up direction for the methodological modeling of interdisciplinary research based on concrete interactions among individuals within interdisciplinary projects. Drawing on our experience in Hearing the Voice (a cross-disciplinary project on auditory verbal hallucinations running at Durham University), we focus on the dynamic if also problematic integration of cognitive science (neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and of mind), phenomenology, and humanistic disciplines (literature, narratology, history, and theology). We propose a new model for disciplinary integration which brings to the fore an under-investigated dynamic of interdisciplinary projects, namely their being processes of distributed cognition and cognitive integration. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:603–612. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1305 This article is categorized under: Philosophy \textgreater Knowledge and Belief
A Transdiagnostic Perspective on Cognitive, Affective, and Neurobiological Processes Underlying Human Suffering. Garland, E. L.; and Howard, M. O. Research on Social Work Practice, 24(1): 142–151. January 2014.
Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{garland_transdiagnostic_2014,
	title = {A {Transdiagnostic} {Perspective} on {Cognitive}, {Affective}, and {Neurobiological} {Processes} {Underlying} {Human} {Suffering}},
	volume = {24},
	issn = {1049-7315, 1552-7581},
	url = {http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1049731513503909},
	doi = {10.1177/1049731513503909},
	abstract = {The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and International Classification of Diseases classify mental health disorders on the basis of their putatively distinct symptom profiles. Although these nosologies are highly influential, they also have been derided as mere ‘‘field guides’’ because they focus solely on the superficial symptomatic expression of psychiatric syndromes rather than on the commonalities underlying psychiatric disorders. Recently, an alternative transdiagnostic perspective has emerged. This review addresses transdiagnostic processes that underlie a wide range of psychosocial problems commonly addressed by social work practitioners. First, we describe how the transdiagnostic perspective differs from categorical views of psychopathology and accords more closely with scientific evidence. Next, we review current experimental psychopathology and neuroscience research to detail the cognitive, affective, and neurobiological features of five transdiagnostic processes. Finally, we discuss how the transdiagnostic perspective may improve therapeutic outcomes and guide the implementation of targeted social work interventions.},
	language = {en},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2020-03-19},
	journal = {Research on Social Work Practice},
	author = {Garland, Eric L. and Howard, Matthew O.},
	month = jan,
	year = {2014},
	pages = {142--151},
}
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and International Classification of Diseases classify mental health disorders on the basis of their putatively distinct symptom profiles. Although these nosologies are highly influential, they also have been derided as mere ‘‘field guides’’ because they focus solely on the superficial symptomatic expression of psychiatric syndromes rather than on the commonalities underlying psychiatric disorders. Recently, an alternative transdiagnostic perspective has emerged. This review addresses transdiagnostic processes that underlie a wide range of psychosocial problems commonly addressed by social work practitioners. First, we describe how the transdiagnostic perspective differs from categorical views of psychopathology and accords more closely with scientific evidence. Next, we review current experimental psychopathology and neuroscience research to detail the cognitive, affective, and neurobiological features of five transdiagnostic processes. Finally, we discuss how the transdiagnostic perspective may improve therapeutic outcomes and guide the implementation of targeted social work interventions.
  2013 (2)
Life as we know it. Friston, K. Journal of The Royal Society Interface, 10(86): 20130475. September 2013. ZSCC: 0000519 Publisher: Royal Society
Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{friston_life_2013,
	title = {Life as we know it},
	volume = {10},
	url = {https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rsif.2013.0475},
	doi = {10.1098/rsif.2013.0475},
	abstract = {This paper presents a heuristic proof (and simulations of a primordial soup) suggesting that life—or biological self-organization—is an inevitable and emergent property of any (ergodic) random dynamical system that possesses a Markov blanket. This conclusion is based on the following arguments: if the coupling among an ensemble of dynamical systems is mediated by short-range forces, then the states of remote systems must be conditionally independent. These independencies induce a Markov blanket that separates internal and external states in a statistical sense. The existence of a Markov blanket means that internal states will appear to minimize a free energy functional of the states of their Markov blanket. Crucially, this is the same quantity that is optimized in Bayesian inference. Therefore, the internal states (and their blanket) will appear to engage in active Bayesian inference. In other words, they will appear to model—and act on—their world to preserve their functional and structural integrity, leading to homoeostasis and a simple form of autopoiesis.},
	number = {86},
	urldate = {2021-06-05},
	journal = {Journal of The Royal Society Interface},
	author = {Friston, Karl},
	month = sep,
	year = {2013},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000519 
Publisher: Royal Society},
	pages = {20130475},
}

This paper presents a heuristic proof (and simulations of a primordial soup) suggesting that life—or biological self-organization—is an inevitable and emergent property of any (ergodic) random dynamical system that possesses a Markov blanket. This conclusion is based on the following arguments: if the coupling among an ensemble of dynamical systems is mediated by short-range forces, then the states of remote systems must be conditionally independent. These independencies induce a Markov blanket that separates internal and external states in a statistical sense. The existence of a Markov blanket means that internal states will appear to minimize a free energy functional of the states of their Markov blanket. Crucially, this is the same quantity that is optimized in Bayesian inference. Therefore, the internal states (and their blanket) will appear to engage in active Bayesian inference. In other words, they will appear to model—and act on—their world to preserve their functional and structural integrity, leading to homoeostasis and a simple form of autopoiesis.
Mind, body, world: foundations of cognitive science. Dawson, M. R. W. of OPELAU Press, Edmonton, 2013. ZSCC: 0000053 OCLC: 868337659
link   bibtex  
@book{dawson_mind_2013,
	address = {Edmonton},
	series = {{OPEL}},
	title = {Mind, body, world: foundations of cognitive science},
	isbn = {978-1-927356-17-3},
	shorttitle = {Mind, body, world},
	language = {en},
	publisher = {AU Press},
	author = {Dawson, Michael R. W.},
	year = {2013},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000053 
OCLC: 868337659},
}

  2011 (1)
Developmental Systems Science: Exploring the Application of Systems Science Methods to Developmental Science Questions. Urban, J. B.; Osgood, N.; and Mabry, P. Research in Human Development, 8(1): 1–25. January 2011. ZSCC: 0000057
Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{urban_developmental_2011,
	title = {Developmental {Systems} {Science}: {Exploring} the {Application} of {Systems} {Science} {Methods} to {Developmental} {Science} {Questions}},
	volume = {8},
	issn = {1542-7609},
	shorttitle = {Developmental {Systems} {Science}},
	url = {http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15427609.2011.549686},
	doi = {10.1080/15427609.2011.549686},
	abstract = {Developmental science theorists fully acknowledge the wide array of complex interactions between biology, behavior, and environment that together give rise to development. However, despite this conceptual understanding of development as a system, developmental science has not fully applied analytic methods commensurate with this systems perspective. This paper provides a brief introduction to systems science, an approach to problem-solving that involves the use of methods especially equipped to handle complex relationships and their evolution over time. Moreover, we provide a rationale for why and how these methods can serve the needs of the developmental science research community. A variety of developmental science theories are reviewed and the need for systems science methodologies is demonstrated. This is followed by an abridged primer on systems science terminology and concepts, with specific attention to how these concepts relate to similar concepts in developmental science. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to demonstrate the utility of systems science methodologies. We hope that this article inspires developmental scientists to learn more about systems science methodologies and to begin to use them in their work.},
	language = {en},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2020-06-05},
	journal = {Research in Human Development},
	author = {Urban, Jennifer Brown and Osgood, Nathaniel and Mabry, Patricia},
	month = jan,
	year = {2011},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000057},
	pages = {1--25},
}

Developmental science theorists fully acknowledge the wide array of complex interactions between biology, behavior, and environment that together give rise to development. However, despite this conceptual understanding of development as a system, developmental science has not fully applied analytic methods commensurate with this systems perspective. This paper provides a brief introduction to systems science, an approach to problem-solving that involves the use of methods especially equipped to handle complex relationships and their evolution over time. Moreover, we provide a rationale for why and how these methods can serve the needs of the developmental science research community. A variety of developmental science theories are reviewed and the need for systems science methodologies is demonstrated. This is followed by an abridged primer on systems science terminology and concepts, with specific attention to how these concepts relate to similar concepts in developmental science. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to demonstrate the utility of systems science methodologies. We hope that this article inspires developmental scientists to learn more about systems science methodologies and to begin to use them in their work.
  2009 (2)
A multilevel approach to building and leading learning organizations. Hannah, S. T.; and Lester, P. B. The Leadership Quarterly, 20(1): 34–48. February 2009. ZSCC: 0000313
Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{hannah_multilevel_2009,
	title = {A multilevel approach to building and leading learning organizations},
	volume = {20},
	issn = {10489843},
	url = {https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1048984308001604},
	doi = {10.1016/j.leaqua.2008.11.003},
	abstract = {A multilevel model is offered proposing that organizational learning is an interdependent system where effective leaders enact intervention strategies at the individual (micro), network (meso), and systems (macro) levels. We suggest that leaders approach organizational learning by setting the conditions and structure for learning to occur, while limiting direct interference in the actual creative processes. First, leaders may increase the level of developmental readiness of individual followers, thereby increasing their motivation and ability to approach learning experiences and adapt their mental models. These individuals then serve as catalysts of learning within and between social networks. Second, leaders may promote the diffusion of knowledge between these knowledge catalysts within and across social networks through influencing both the structure and functioning of knowledge networks. Finally, leaders may target actions at the systems level to improve the diffusion to, and institutionalization of, knowledge to the larger organization.},
	language = {en},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2020-06-05},
	journal = {The Leadership Quarterly},
	author = {Hannah, Sean T. and Lester, Paul B.},
	month = feb,
	year = {2009},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000313},
	pages = {34--48},
}

A multilevel model is offered proposing that organizational learning is an interdependent system where effective leaders enact intervention strategies at the individual (micro), network (meso), and systems (macro) levels. We suggest that leaders approach organizational learning by setting the conditions and structure for learning to occur, while limiting direct interference in the actual creative processes. First, leaders may increase the level of developmental readiness of individual followers, thereby increasing their motivation and ability to approach learning experiences and adapt their mental models. These individuals then serve as catalysts of learning within and between social networks. Second, leaders may promote the diffusion of knowledge between these knowledge catalysts within and across social networks through influencing both the structure and functioning of knowledge networks. Finally, leaders may target actions at the systems level to improve the diffusion to, and institutionalization of, knowledge to the larger organization.
Does a continuous feedback system improve psychotherapy outcome?. Reese, R. J.; Norsworthy, L. A.; and Rowlands, S. R. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 46(4): 418–431. 2009. ZSCC: 0000290
Paper   doi   link   bibtex  
@article{reese_does_2009,
	title = {Does a continuous feedback system improve psychotherapy outcome?},
	volume = {46},
	issn = {1939-1536, 0033-3204},
	url = {http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/a0017901},
	doi = {10.1037/a0017901},
	language = {en},
	number = {4},
	urldate = {2020-04-02},
	journal = {Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training},
	author = {Reese, Robert J. and Norsworthy, Larry A. and Rowlands, Steve R.},
	year = {2009},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000290},
	pages = {418--431},
}

  2008 (2)
Why Are Computational Neuroscience and Systems Biology So Separate?. Schutter, E. D. PLOS Computational Biology, 4(5): e1000078. May 2008. ZSCC: 0000102 Publisher: Public Library of Science
Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{schutter_why_2008,
	title = {Why {Are} {Computational} {Neuroscience} and {Systems} {Biology} {So} {Separate}?},
	volume = {4},
	issn = {1553-7358},
	url = {https://journals.plos.org/ploscompbiol/article?id=10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000078},
	doi = {10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000078},
	abstract = {Despite similar computational approaches, there is surprisingly little interaction between the computational neuroscience and the systems biology research communities. In this review I reconstruct the history of the two disciplines and show that this may explain why they grew up apart. The separation is a pity, as both fields can learn quite a bit from each other. Several examples are given, covering sociological, software technical, and methodological aspects. Systems biology is a better organized community which is very effective at sharing resources, while computational neuroscience has more experience in multiscale modeling and the analysis of information processing by biological systems. Finally, I speculate about how the relationship between the two fields may evolve in the near future.},
	language = {en},
	number = {5},
	urldate = {2021-04-20},
	journal = {PLOS Computational Biology},
	author = {Schutter, Erik De},
	month = may,
	year = {2008},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000102 
Publisher: Public Library of Science},
	keywords = {Cellular neuroscience, Computational neuroscience, Computer software, Information processing, Neural networks, Neuronal dendrites, Neurons, Systems biology},
	pages = {e1000078},
}

Despite similar computational approaches, there is surprisingly little interaction between the computational neuroscience and the systems biology research communities. In this review I reconstruct the history of the two disciplines and show that this may explain why they grew up apart. The separation is a pity, as both fields can learn quite a bit from each other. Several examples are given, covering sociological, software technical, and methodological aspects. Systems biology is a better organized community which is very effective at sharing resources, while computational neuroscience has more experience in multiscale modeling and the analysis of information processing by biological systems. Finally, I speculate about how the relationship between the two fields may evolve in the near future.
Why Are Computational Neuroscience and Systems Biology So Separate?. Schutter, E. D. PLOS Computational Biology, 4(5): e1000078. May 2008. ZSCC: 0000102 Publisher: Public Library of Science
Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{schutter_why_2008-1,
	title = {Why {Are} {Computational} {Neuroscience} and {Systems} {Biology} {So} {Separate}?},
	volume = {4},
	issn = {1553-7358},
	url = {https://journals.plos.org/ploscompbiol/article?id=10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000078},
	doi = {10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000078},
	abstract = {Despite similar computational approaches, there is surprisingly little interaction between the computational neuroscience and the systems biology research communities. In this review I reconstruct the history of the two disciplines and show that this may explain why they grew up apart. The separation is a pity, as both fields can learn quite a bit from each other. Several examples are given, covering sociological, software technical, and methodological aspects. Systems biology is a better organized community which is very effective at sharing resources, while computational neuroscience has more experience in multiscale modeling and the analysis of information processing by biological systems. Finally, I speculate about how the relationship between the two fields may evolve in the near future.},
	language = {en},
	number = {5},
	urldate = {2021-04-20},
	journal = {PLOS Computational Biology},
	author = {Schutter, Erik De},
	month = may,
	year = {2008},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000102 
Publisher: Public Library of Science},
	keywords = {Cellular neuroscience, Computational neuroscience, Computer software, Information processing, Neural networks, Neuronal dendrites, Neurons, Systems biology},
	pages = {e1000078},
}

Despite similar computational approaches, there is surprisingly little interaction between the computational neuroscience and the systems biology research communities. In this review I reconstruct the history of the two disciplines and show that this may explain why they grew up apart. The separation is a pity, as both fields can learn quite a bit from each other. Several examples are given, covering sociological, software technical, and methodological aspects. Systems biology is a better organized community which is very effective at sharing resources, while computational neuroscience has more experience in multiscale modeling and the analysis of information processing by biological systems. Finally, I speculate about how the relationship between the two fields may evolve in the near future.
  2005 (1)
In search of the enactive: Introduction to special issue on enactive experience. Torrance, S. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences, 4(4): 357–368. December 2005. ZSCC: 0000098
Paper   doi   link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{torrance_search_2005,
	title = {In search of the enactive: {Introduction} to special issue on enactive experience},
	volume = {4},
	issn = {1568-7759, 1572-8676},
	shorttitle = {In search of the enactive},
	url = {http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11097-005-9004-9},
	doi = {10.1007/s11097-005-9004-9},
	abstract = {In the decade and a half since the appearance of Varela, Thompson and Rosch’s work The Embodied Mind, enactivism has helped to put experience and consciousness, conceived of in a distinctive way, at the forefront of cognitive science. There are at least two major strands within the enactive perspective: a broad view of what it is to be an agent with a mind; and a more focused account of the nature of perception and perceptual experience. The relation between these two strands is discussed, with an overview of the papers presented in this volume.},
	language = {en},
	number = {4},
	urldate = {2020-06-05},
	journal = {Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences},
	author = {Torrance, Steve},
	month = dec,
	year = {2005},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000098},
	pages = {357--368},
}

In the decade and a half since the appearance of Varela, Thompson and Rosch’s work The Embodied Mind, enactivism has helped to put experience and consciousness, conceived of in a distinctive way, at the forefront of cognitive science. There are at least two major strands within the enactive perspective: a broad view of what it is to be an agent with a mind; and a more focused account of the nature of perception and perceptual experience. The relation between these two strands is discussed, with an overview of the papers presented in this volume.
  2003 (1)
From autopoiesis to neurophenomenology: Francisco Varela's exploration of the biophysics of being. Rudrauf, D.; Lutz, A.; Cosmelli, D.; Lachaux, J.; and Le Van Quyen, M. Biological Research, 36(1). 2003. ZSCC: 0000281
Paper   doi   link   bibtex  
@article{rudrauf_autopoiesis_2003,
	title = {From autopoiesis to neurophenomenology: {Francisco} {Varela}'s exploration of the biophysics of being},
	volume = {36},
	issn = {0716-9760},
	shorttitle = {From autopoiesis to neurophenomenology},
	url = {http://www.scielo.cl/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0716-97602003000100005&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en},
	doi = {10.4067/S0716-97602003000100005},
	language = {en},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2020-06-05},
	journal = {Biological Research},
	author = {Rudrauf, David and Lutz, Antoine and Cosmelli, Diego and Lachaux, Jean-Philippe and Le Van Quyen, Michel},
	year = {2003},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000281},
	keywords = {***, autonomous systems, brain dynamics, consciousness, embodiment, francisco varela, neurophenomenology},
}

  undefined (6)
Individuals, Organizations & Ideas.
Paper   link   bibtex   abstract  
@misc{noauthor_individuals_nodate,
	title = {Individuals, {Organizations} \& {Ideas}},
	url = {https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1OakXsOBaXnoKKXHON4xQSvb29Uf2TwLRzmIrJpk1aoo/edit?usp=drive_web&ouid=107429413187361630049&usp=embed_facebook},
	abstract = {Master 2

Link,Contact,Contact',Contact '',Topic,Topic',Topic '',Structure,Function,Function',
Title,Description,Description',Sub Title
{\textless}a href="https://mindbrain.ucdavis.edu/news"{\textgreater}UC Davis {\textbar} Center For Mind \& Brain{\textless}/a{\textgreater},Mind \& Brain,Academic Organization,Research \& Development,Education,UC Davis ...},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2021-12-20},
	journal = {Google Docs},
}

Master 2 Link,Contact,Contact',Contact '',Topic,Topic',Topic '',Structure,Function,Function', Title,Description,Description',Sub Title \textlessa href="https://mindbrain.ucdavis.edu/news"\textgreaterUC Davis \textbar Center For Mind & Brain\textless/a\textgreater,Mind & Brain,Academic Organization,Research & Development,Education,UC Davis ...
GROWING CONVERGENCE RESEARCH \textbar NSF - National Science Foundation.
Paper   link   bibtex  
@misc{noauthor_growing_nodate,
	title = {{GROWING} {CONVERGENCE} {RESEARCH} {\textbar} {NSF} - {National} {Science} {Foundation}},
	url = {https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505637&org=OIA&from=home},
	urldate = {2021-06-15},
}

Beer’s Viable System Model and Luhmann’s Communication Theory: “Organizations” from the Perspective of Metagames. Johnson, M.; and Leydesdorff, L. ,23. .
link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{johnson_beers_nodate,
	title = {Beer’s {Viable} {System} {Model} and {Luhmann}’s {Communication} {Theory}: “{Organizations}” from the {Perspective} of {Metagames}},
	abstract = {Beyond the descriptions of ‘viability’ provided by Beer’s Viable System Model, Maturana’s autopoietic theory or Luhmann’s communication theory, questions remain as to what ‘viability’ means across different contexts. How is ‘viability’ affected by the Internet and the changing information environments in a knowledge-based economy? For Luhmann, social systems like businesses are coordination systems that do not ‘live’ as viable systems but operate because they relieve human beings from environmental complexity. We situate Beer’s concept of viability with Luhmann’s through analyzing the way that ‘decisions’ shape organizations in an information environment. Howard’s (1971) metagame analysis enables us to consider the ‘viable system’ as an ‘agent system’ producing utterances as moves in a discourse game within the context of its information environment. We discuss how this approach can lead to an accommodation between Beer’s practical orientation and Luhmann’s sociological critique where the relationship between viability, decision and information can be further explored.},
	language = {en},
	author = {Johnson, Mark and Leydesdorff, Loet},
	pages = {23},
}

Beyond the descriptions of ‘viability’ provided by Beer’s Viable System Model, Maturana’s autopoietic theory or Luhmann’s communication theory, questions remain as to what ‘viability’ means across different contexts. How is ‘viability’ affected by the Internet and the changing information environments in a knowledge-based economy? For Luhmann, social systems like businesses are coordination systems that do not ‘live’ as viable systems but operate because they relieve human beings from environmental complexity. We situate Beer’s concept of viability with Luhmann’s through analyzing the way that ‘decisions’ shape organizations in an information environment. Howard’s (1971) metagame analysis enables us to consider the ‘viable system’ as an ‘agent system’ producing utterances as moves in a discourse game within the context of its information environment. We discuss how this approach can lead to an accommodation between Beer’s practical orientation and Luhmann’s sociological critique where the relationship between viability, decision and information can be further explored.
A Tutorial in Autopoiesis. Whitaker, D. R. ,40. . ZSCC: 0000001
link   bibtex  
@article{whitaker_tutorial_nodate,
	title = {A {Tutorial} in {Autopoiesis}},
	language = {en},
	author = {Whitaker, Dr Randall},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000001},
	pages = {40},
}

Dissertation submitted for the degree of Doctor in the Interdisciplinary Studies. Busseniers, E. ,270. . ZSCC: NoCitationData[s0]
link   bibtex   abstract  
@article{busseniers_dissertation_nodate,
	title = {Dissertation submitted for the degree of {Doctor} in the {Interdisciplinary} {Studies}},
	abstract = {In combining anarchist theory with mathematics, this thesis wishes to better understand what power and hierarchy are in order to explore how we can live without coercion. My motivation to study these concepts stems from observing a lack of freedom in contemporary society despite a lack of obvious coercion or clear hierarchical structure.},
	language = {en},
	author = {Busseniers, Evo},
	note = {ZSCC: NoCitationData[s0]},
	pages = {270},
}

In combining anarchist theory with mathematics, this thesis wishes to better understand what power and hierarchy are in order to explore how we can live without coercion. My motivation to study these concepts stems from observing a lack of freedom in contemporary society despite a lack of obvious coercion or clear hierarchical structure.
Multidimensional and Multiscale Analysis of Interactions in Social Systems. Botterman, H.; Lamarche-Perrin, R.; Latapy, M.; Magnien, C.; Panichi, L.; Siglidis, Y.; Viard, T.; and Wilmet, A. ,84. . ZSCC: 0000000
link   bibtex  
@article{botterman_multidimensional_nodate,
	title = {Multidimensional and {Multiscale} {Analysis} of {Interactions} in {Social} {Systems}},
	language = {en},
	author = {Botterman, Hong-Lan and Lamarche-Perrin, Robin and Latapy, Matthieu and Magnien, Clemence and Panichi, Leonard and Siglidis, Yiannis and Viard, Tiphaine and Wilmet, Audrey},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000000},
	pages = {84},
}

See Also

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autopoiesis
Edge.Org: Francisco Varella’s “The Emergent Self”
Randall Whitaker’s “The Observer Web: Autopoiesis and Enaction”


This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
error: Content is protected !!
  • Who are You? Who am I? And the Problem of Identity Optics
Exit mobile version